Fortune Seller: A TV Scam Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online
September 27, 2022

Fortune Seller: A TV Scam Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online

Fortune Seller
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Fortune Seller: A TV Scam Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online

A docu-series that reconstructs a practically unique economic, media and criminal story, Wanna moves between the documentary itself and reportage, first by captivating and then (deliberately) rejecting the viewer. A spectator who, even when he knows the facts, cannot help but seek a rational motivation for an evil that is as aware as it is, in reality, deeply irrational.

After the surprise announcement last May, as part of the presentation of Netflix’s new Italian projects, the already discussed docu-series Wanna finally arrives on the platform. A product, this one created by Alessandro Garramone , which traces in great detail the history of what was for twenty years the Italian television broadcaster par excellence: a story that, in its final years, has turned into a case of fraud among the more incredible than recent history recalls, with the famous “scoop” of Striscia la Notizia , a gigantic investigation by the Guardia di Finanza, and the discovery of a billionaire scam by Wanna Marchi , her daughter Stefania Nobileand of the “teacher of life” Mário Pacheco do Nascimento . Characters to whom this miniseries, four episodes for just over three hours in total, gives ample space, alternating their story of the facts with that of the variegated group of witnesses, more or less occasional fellow travelers, friends, enemies and victims.

In this regard, it is necessary to immediately clear the field of any possible doubt: Wanna is in no way an acquittal product, and not even one that arouses ambiguous as well as belated sympathies. The choice of giving such ample space to the narration of the facts by the protagonists helps, if anything, to create a more complete picture of an almost unique twenty-year story; a story that even in its most grotesque sides (as well as in the most hateful ones) represents a bit of the “other side” of that Italian media story which had its driving force in the breakthrough of private TV channels. A story that, on several occasions, was inevitably colored by noir and true crime hues.

Divided into four episodes, each aimed at the story of a specific phase of the empire created by Wanna Marchi (eloquent the titles: Scoglipancia , Diavoli , Mago and Cattive ), Wannafollows in great detail what has been a double parable of rise, fall, rebirth and definitive collapse. A story that starts from the magmatic Italian television reality of the late 1970s, when the liberalization of the ether caused the proliferation of private networks, with the consequent search for more specific and effective means of financing than simple advertising. After all, teleshopping – a means of which the Romagna presenter will soon become the undisputed leader – were nothing more than a natural consequence of a different way of understanding television, marked by a relationship that is both more intimate and more aggressive with the viewer. Two aspects that, as evidenced by the first episode of the series, Wanna Marchi was able to perfectly grasp, with a communicative style that is as rough as it is unconsciously capable of capturing the moods of the time. In this regard, the story of one of the presenter’s first live shows within a container of a private network is significant; an episode in which, according to her own words, Marchi publicly apologized to the broadcaster for the meager results of the previous live shows, and announced her desire to retire, distraught. The involuntary (or perhaps not) shifting of a commercial transmission to a more emotional register provoked the sympathy of the public, and a “connection” that would have been maintained, in different forms, for about twenty years. An emotional register that in the following years would have declined, rather than in terms of affection,

From her second episode onwards, Wanna ‘s narrative takes on decidedly more noir tones, parallel to the legal events that have crossed the path of the presenter: from the burning of her shop to the chronicle of the domestic abuses perpetrated by her first husband (the former entrepreneur, and Stefania’s father, Raimondo Nobile , in turn interviewed in the series), from the swirling rounds of money of the 1980s to the wrong investments, up to bankruptcy and prison in 1990. In between, the company’s relations with the disturbing figure by Milva Magliano, collaborator of Wanna and Stefania associated with the New Organized Camorra, already convicted and subsequently suspected of being responsible for the attack on the brand shop. The interview with Magliano – with the disarming ease with which she uses a typically mafia language to talk about those years – turns out to be one of the most successful, and most positively unsettling, elements of this docu-series. More generally, in his exploration of various aspects of an economic, media and criminal affair on which several obscure points still remain, Wanna has the merit of shedding light on some of the lesser-known characters who gravitated around the Trademark empire: among these, the mysterious Marquis Attilio Capra de Carrè, an entrepreneur already associated with P2, with important political friendships, who helped the brands to rebuild their empire, only to be discharged – practically overnight – when Wanna and Stefania returned to the crest of the wave. An involvement with dark features, that of Capra de Carrè, told in its various aspects by the investigative journalist Peter Gomez , whose testimony contributes to the variegated mosaic reconstructed by the series. A mosaic whose exploration is “guided” by the journalist Stefano Zurlo , whose presence is however limited to act as a link between the various pieces of history.

The first comparison that comes to mind, for a product like Wanna , is that with SanPa: Luci e tenebre di San Patrignano , mainly for the similar format and for the similar attempt to investigate a single, emblematic personality of a specific period of Italian history. . However, while the 2020 docu-series kept a more uniform tone in its development – coherently with an approach that wanted to investigate, as the title suggests, “the lights and the darkness” – the Wanna register evolves parallel to the story . of its object: the trashy and apparently harmless cialtroneria of the first Marchi ( “at the beginning it could appear nice” , declares the former TV dealer Joe Denti several times) soon gives way to a much more disturbing character; the one who perhaps suddenly lost all residual contact with reality, seized by a sort of pathological and (self) destructive delusion of omnipotence. The current Marchi, the eighty-year-old woman interviewed by the authors, also retraces in the way of doing (unconsciously?) All the phases of her character, arriving in the final part – when she reaffirms, in total harmony with her daughter, the absolute absence of repentance for the perpetrated scams – to make oneself hate (again); and she gets there provoking that repulsion and that sense of absolute distance in which (perhaps) she and Stefania Nobile still feel at ease. From the Alessandro Garramone series, the presence of the “teacher of life” Do Nascimento is also appreciable – at least from a journalistic point of view. discovered in Brazil after a long search; a character – almost unrecognizable today – whose words (typical of those who are almost unaware of the extent of his actions) help to outline the human and cultural squalor in which the Marchi empire grew and crumbled. A squalor that the series manages to render with a flat but appreciable chronical air, interspersed with fragments of fiction (the reconstructed sequences, the symbolic dances of the two women in the middle of the money) that somehow bring the viewer closer to the story. A spectator first enthralled, and then deliberately rejected by events, in search of an explanation ( a character – today almost unrecognizable – whose words (typical of those who are almost unaware of the extent of his actions) help to outline the human and cultural squalor in which the Marchi empire grew and crumbled. A squalor that the series manages to render with a flat but appreciable chronical air, interspersed with fragments of fiction (the reconstructed sequences, the symbolic dances of the two women in the middle of the money) that somehow bring the viewer closer to the story. A spectator first enthralled, and then deliberately rejected by events, in search of an explanation ( a character – today almost unrecognizable – whose words (typical of those who are almost unaware of the extent of his actions) help to outline the human and cultural squalor in which the Marchi empire grew and crumbled. A squalor that the series manages to render with a flat but appreciable chronical air, interspersed with fragments of fiction (the reconstructed sequences, the symbolic dances of the two women in the middle of the money) that somehow bring the viewer closer to the story. A spectator first enthralled, and then deliberately rejected by events, in search of an explanation ( the symbolic dances of the two women in the midst of money) that somehow bring the viewer closer to each other. A spectator first enthralled, and then deliberately rejected by events, in search of an explanation ( the symbolic dances of the two women in the midst of money) that somehow bring the viewer closer to each other. A spectator first enthralled, and then deliberately rejected by events, in search of an explanation (“Why did they have to scam people, if they were already so rich?” , a witness asks) that no series and no film will probably ever give.

Fortune Seller: A TV Scam Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online