Willow Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online
February 4, 2023

Willow Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online

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Willow Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online

Based on the initial episodes currently available, this is shaping up to be an engaging, swashbuckling adventure that, while stuffed with fantasy cliches, at least has some fun playing with them.

In the 1988 film to which this show is a sequel, and which is probably useful though not essential prior viewing, warrior princess Sorsha, scoundrel swordsman Madmartigan and farmer-turned-sorceror Willow save baby Elora Danan, prophesied saviour, and defeat Sorsha’s mother, evil sorceress Queen Bavmorda.

This series opens a couple of decades later, with Sorsha ruling and Madmartigan missing for some years. Both Princess Kit, their daughter, and her twin brother, Airk (in a nice touch, named after a friend of Madmartigan’s from the original film) are chips off the old block, taking after their cocky, selfish yet charming father in different ways. Kit’s mother is trying to push her into marrying scholarly but drippy Prince Graydon to help unite the realm against a looming evil. But the night before the planned wedding, the castle is attacked by some really creepy-looking baddies and Airk kidnapped. Kit sets out to rescue him with a party including her friend and aspiring knight, Jade, Graydon, and freed prisoner Boorman. Along the way, they pick up “Dove”, who works in the castle kitchens and has set off herself to help Airk, with whom she believes herself to be in love, and of course the titular sorceror, Willow.

The acting is generally decent, with stand-out performances in the early episodes from Amar Chadha-Patel as rogueish Boorman, Hannah Waddingham as a Coen-brothers-esque woodswoman, and Annabelle Davis as Mims, the daughter of her real-life dad Warwick Davis’s character, Willow. Honourable mentions also go to Ellie Bamber, whose comedic delivery saves Dove from saccharine sweetness, Tony Revolori, who makes Graydon more than simply a one-dimensional undesirable suitor, and Graham Hughes as Willow’s friend Silas. Oddly enough, it’s returning actor Warwick Davis who seems least comfortable with his character. He delivers his dry one-liners with aplomb, but is awfully unconvincing with longer speeches. Though to be fair to him, there is some horribly clunky dialogue and exposition.

Like probably too much fantasy, the generally impressively realised setting of Willow resembles mediaeval Europe, but it quite rightly doesn’t feel constrained to pretend it’s set in this real past or to adopt cod olde-worlde speech patterns or attitudes. It’s not quite as full-on swashbuckling comedy as The Princess Bride or Pirates of the Caribbean, but like the original Willow movie it doesn’t take itself or its characters too seriously.

It doesn’t feel as though it’s quite found its tone or groove yet, and the story and script are going to have to become a whole lot cleverer if they’re going to carry off the show’s unoriginal premise and plethora of fantasy stereotypes. But there are some real laughs in the first episodes that offer some grounds for optimism that the writers and actors do have the ability to deliver a witty, enjoyable story that affectionately subverts familiar fantasy tropes.

Willow Review 2022 Tv Show Series Cast Crew Online